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Strategy-based Reasoning Training Modulates Cortical Thickness and Resting-state Functional Connectivity in Adults With Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

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Brain and Behavior

Kihwan Han, Rebecca A. Davis, Sandra B. Chapman and Daniel C. Krawczyk

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Overview

With increased awareness of the long-term effects of traumatic brain injury on cognition, many researchers are curious as to what can be done to enhance recovery. In this study, researchers used Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Tactics, or SMART™ Brain Training, and measured the cortical thickness in 60 individuals with chronic TBI pre- training, immediately post-training, and 3 months post-training. Findings suggest that brain connectivity and cortical thickness may serve as markers of plasticity, and that brain plasticity induced through cognitive training can continue throughout the chronic phases of TBI.
Colormaps for nonmonotonic (a) and monotonic (b) within‐ and between‐group contrasts for changes in cortical thickness over time (p vertex < .05, p cluster < .05). SMART, strategic memory advanced reasoning training; BHW, brain health workshop; L, left; R, right; DLPFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; SCG, subcentral gyrus; DPFC, dorsal prefrontal cortex; AMPFC, anterior medial prefrontal cortex; PRCG, precentral gyrus; PCG, postcentral gyrus; MT+, middle temporal complex; LG, lingual gyrus; APFC, anterior prefrontal cortex; OCPL, occipito‐parietal lobe

Colormaps for nonmonotonic (a) and monotonic (b) within‐ and between‐group contrasts for changes in cortical thickness over time (p vertex < .05, p cluster < .05). SMART™, Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Tactics; BHW, brain health workshop; L, left; R, right; DLPFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; SCG, subcentral gyrus; DPFC, dorsal prefrontal cortex; AMPFC, anterior medial prefrontal cortex; PRCG, precentral gyrus; PCG, postcentral gyrus; MT+, middle temporal complex; LG, lingual gyrus; APFC, anterior prefrontal cortex; OCPL, occipito‐parietal lobe

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Sandra Bond Chapman, PhD

Chief Director Dee Wyly Distinguished Professor, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences Co-Leader, The BrainHealth Project

Daniel Krawczyk, PhD

Deputy Director of Research Debbie and Jim Francis Chair and Professor, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences


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