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Carbon Aerosols and Atmospheric Photochemistry

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Journal of Geophysical Research

D.J. Lary, A.M. Lee, R. Toumi, M.J. Newchurch, M. Pirre and J.B. Renard

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Overview

Carbon aerosols are released by combustion processes and react with elements of the ozone layer. Because each hemisphere of the Earth has varying soot levels in the atmosphere, there should be different rates of ozone layer depletion in each hemisphere. However, this is not the case, and the ozone layer has been shown to be depleted at similar rates around the globe. Here, the authors suggest this could be due to a renoxification mechanism that produces reactive gasses and balances ozone loss through the stratospheric and tropospheric ozone layers.

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AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT
Dr. David Lary in a suit in front of computers, vertical. Professor of Physics in the Hanson Center for Space Sciences; Founding Director of MINTS (Multi-Use Multi-scale Integrated Interactive Intelligent Sensing and Simulation in Service of  Society); Center for Brain Health Investigator

David Lary, PhD

BrainHealth Investigator Professor of Physics, Hanson Center for Space Sciences Founding Director, MINTS