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Bart Rypma, PhD

Bart Rypma in a blue blazer in a professional setting, landscape. Professor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Meadows Foundation Endowed Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences
Director, UT Dallas Center for BrainHealth Imaging Center

Principal Investigator Professor, Behavioral and Brain Sciences at UT Dallas Meadows Foundation Endowed Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Director, Sammons BrainHealth Imaging Center

Dr. Bart Rypma’s research is aimed at exploring the cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of human memory and how these are affected by aging and disease. He uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to observe the activity of younger and older adults as they perform cognitive tasks.

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Key Research and Publications

Dr. Rypma has published extensively on the cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of human memory, including high-profile publications in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Nature Neuroscience, Cerebral Cortex and Neuroimage.

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Altered Linear Coupling Between Stimulus-Evoked Blood Flow and Oxygen Metabolism in the Aging Human Brain

Human aging affects the structural integrity of neural-vascular coupling (NVC), which plays a critical role in healthy neural function by delivering oxygen and nutrients to metabolically active neurons.

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A Neural-Vascular Complex of Age-Related Changes in the Human Brain: Anatomy, Physiology, and Implications for Neurocognitive Aging

Age-related changes in neural-vascular coupling can shed light on causes of cognitive decline in older adults, and reveal limitations of current scientific knowledge.

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BOLD Hemodynamic Response Function Changes Significantly with Healthy Aging

Healthy older and younger individuals demonstrate significant differences in the brain’s blood-oxygen response, as shown with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

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Baseline Cerebral Metabolism Predicts Fatigue and Cognition in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

MRI technology permits non-invasive monitoring of brain oxygen metabolism, a measurement shown to be predictive of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, common effects of multiple sclerosis.

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Reexamination of “Release-From-Pi” Phenomena: Recall Accuracy Does Not Recover After a Semantic Switch

Word recall improves when words are semantically different or have different meanings and declines when word are similar in semantics or meaning, a phenomenon known as proactive interference.

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Q&A with Seed Grant Winner, Dr. Bart Rypma

Dr. Bart Rypma was recently awarded the Major Extramural Grant Award (MEGA) for Development of Calibrated fMRI at the UT Dallas Center for BrainHealth Imaging Center. Dr. Rypma’s research is aimed at exploring the cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of human memory and how those mechanisms are affected by aging and disease. Dr. Rypma is a professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at The University of Texas at Dallas and The UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas School of Psychiatry. 

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Phone Number

972.883.3235