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Cognitive Gains from Gist Reasoning Training in Adolescents with Chronic-Stage Traumatic Brain Injury

A group of diverse happy teenagers taking a close-up photo, smiling to the camera. IStock#: 826221008.

Frontiers in Neurology

Lori B. Cook, Sandra B. Chapman, Allan C. Elliott, Nellie N. Evenson and Kami Vinton

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Overview

Adolescents can recover old skills such as speech, movement, coordination, and simple problem-solving abilities rather quickly following a TBI. However, acquiring new skills, highly complex thinking, abstract reasoning and problem-solving can remain impaired. These impairments cause difficulty in school, especially as the demands increase through middle and high school.  This study demonstrated that implementing only six hours of Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Tactics (SMART™) led to significant improvement in the ability to think abstractly and recall information. Even months to years after injury, these adolescents can improve certain cognitive impairments that were once thought to be long-lasting.

Table 2 outlines the two alternate conditions participants were assigned and their respective timeline and focus of training throughout their eight-week participation.

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AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT
Lori Cook in a blue blouse with blue lights, vertical. Director of Clinical Research, BrainHealth Research; Head of Research, The BrainHealth Project; Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Lori Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

Director of Clinical Research Head of Research, The BrainHealth Project Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Sandi Chapman with blue jacket and green/blue lights, horizontal. Founder and Chief Director, Center for BrainHealth, Co-Leader, The BrainHealth Project Dee Wyly Distinguished Professor

Sandra Bond Chapman, PhD

Chief Director Dee Wyly Distinguished Professor, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences Co-Leader, The BrainHealth Project