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Preserved Canonicality of the BOLD Hemodynamic Response Reflects Healthy Cognition: Insights into the Healthy Brain through the Window of Multiple Sclerosis

Abstract brain made of geometric lines and dots in a dark blue background.

NeuroImage

Monroe P. Turner, Nicholas A. Hubbard, Dinesh K. Sivakolundu, Lyndahl M. Himes, Joanna L. Hutchison, John Hart Jr., Jeffrey S. Spence, Elliot M. Frohman, Teresa C. Frohman, Darin T. Okuda and Bart Rypma

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Overview

In patients with multiple sclerosis, white matter in the brain is damaged, causing impaired cognitive performance. This damage reduces the speed at which blood flow in the brain can change in response to changes in neural activity. Faster change times underlie faster cognitive processing speeds in healthy individuals when compared with MS patients. This suggests that intact neural-vascular communication may play a role in cognitive performance.
Relationships between performance (as measured by RT on the DSST) and (A) peak amplitude and (B) TTP in bilateral BA 9. Lines represent the best fit to the data using least-squares linear regression. Healthy controls are in blue, and MS patients are in orange.

Relationships between performance (as measured by RT on the DSST) and (A) peak amplitude and (B) TTP in bilateral BA 9. Lines represent the best fit to the data using least-squares linear regression. Healthy controls are in blue, and MS patients are in orange.

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AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT
Jeffrey Spence portrait, white background, vertical. Director of Biostatistics at the Center for BrainHealth.

Jeffrey S. Spence, PhD

Director of Biostatistics

Dr. Bart Rypma is wearing a suit with gray background, horizontal- Hero. Close-up.

Bart Rypma, PhD

Principal Investigator Professor, Behavioral and Brain Sciences at UT Dallas Meadows Foundation Endowed Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Director, UT Dallas BrainHealth Imaging Center